Mikal Cronin - MCIII (photo:: )
Album reviews
Artist:
Mikal Cronin
Album:
MCIII
Release year:
2015
Label:
Merge
13 September 2015 / by Alan Gates (author)

I will admit my bias going into this review - I'm a massive Mikal Cronin fan. His self-titled debut album released in 2011 ranks up there as one of my favorite albums of all time. His second album was a masterful follow up. I was giddy at the prospect of a third full-length LP, and spent months anticipating the release of MCIII. When it finally came out this past May, I was pleased, but I have to admit that it hasn't thrilled me as much as the previous two albums.

While Mikal Cronin's music has always had a more radio-friendly element than his friend and frequent collaborator, Ty Segall, many songs on MCIII veer heavily into the pop music category. This made it more difficult for me to distinguish one song from the next. I'm not saying that this is a bad thing for many listeners, but a fan of much noisier garage rock, it just isn't always my cup of tea. Also, Mikal Conin must have been as big a fan of the addition of violin MCII's epic rock anthem 'Change' as I was, because he has violin all over the place on MCIII. However, instead of adding to the emotion of most of the tracks, it seems like a case of having too much of a good thing.

That's not to say that this album isn't without its gems. One place where the violins do add a lot to the music is during 'Feel Like', which is a powerful tune full of emotion that really grabs you as a listener.

Also, 'ii) Gold' is an amazing song that makes this album worth picking up all on its own. The instrumental break from the 2:22 mark to the end of the song may be the best bit of music to come out so far this year. Mikal Cronin seems to be good for at least one instrumental break on each of his albums that blows away the listener.

MCIII should be easy to find at most record stores around town, but if it's your first Mikal Cronin album, I'd strongly recommend picking up his self-titled debut as well. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The author

Alan Gates

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